Is the foundation of microbiological cybernetics a repulsion attraction force potential (RAF) with a hexagonal lattice structure at closed interfaces of the water?

Is the driving force of the swimming test objects an interaction of the repulsion-attraction-force field (RAK = Lennard-Jones-Potential) in the interface layers of the water?

For the table tennis ball experiment you need 1 water glass, filled to the brim with water, a table tennis ball, a paper clip and a straw to vacuum or fill the glass.

Test procedure Fig. 1:

This water glass test in the glass / water / air interface zones shows: if the water level at the edge of the glass changes from a concave to a convex boundary, the freely floating objects on the water surface move in opposite directions with a change in direction of the table tennis ball and paper clip (Fig .1 Fig.1.1 Fig.1.2)

For the floating grain experiment you need 3 different sized water glasses and floating grains (e.g. peppercorns, peas etc.) The different sizes of the glasses are supposed to symbolize the different sizes of the blood vessels.

Test sequence Fig. 2:

The different sizes of the glasses are supposed to symbolize the different sizes of the blood vessels. Here it is shown that the repulsion attraction force potential (RAK) in the cardiovascular system keeps the blood cells at a distance from the vessel wall. The blood cells themselves remain at a distance from one another (they do not stick together), since each cell is equipped with its own closed RAK water layer. (Fig.2 + Fig.2.1)

Test procedure Fig. 3:

In this experiment, the observer changes position several times to the opposite side of the table behind an acrylic pane. The table tennis ball always moves in the direction of the observer, but is stopped approx. 1 cm from the edge of the glass. The reason is: the RAK potential of the edge of the glass and the RAK potential of the water interface of the table tennis ball repel each other. If the observer pushes the tennis balls away from him with a stick, they move back towards the observer after this push (human water column).

Fig.3.1: pink: area of attractio                             blue: repulsion field

Test procedure Fig.4:

The experiment shows the observer's potential for repulsion. The repulsion force field in front of the hand of the observer pushes the table tennis ball only over the RAK potential of the water interface.